HCTC faculty achievements


By Evelyn Wood - For The Hazard Herald



Hazard Community and Technical College added a new way to start faculty meetings this academic year – by highlighting accomplishments. See who was recognized during the fall semester:

Instructor Denessa Mullins started the first class this fall of the Paramedic Program. The revitalization of this program is important to the region.

Professor Jeremy Wood spent his summer creating two lab manuals – one for College Physics I (182 pages) and the other for Applied Physics (230 pages). Jeremy opted to give these to his students online, saving each student $200. The manuals look sharp – with great graphics and nice looking pictures.

Professor Jenny Williams is chair of Pathfinders of Perry County, a non-profit, all-volunteer group that works to get people moving, healthy, and happy. She worked towards the creation of walking trail along the river. Her work with the River Arts Greenway project is continuing.

Professor Jeremiah Bryant and his Troop 84 started the wood carving merit badge. He has enjoyed wood turning and can make pens, keychains, styluses, bowls, and plus more. He is able to present handmade gifts to family and friends.

Assistant Professor Melissa Couch returned to HCTC to revive the Diagnostic Medical Sonography Program.

Professor Ralph Kidd’s Automotive Technology Program received reaccreditation from the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF). In the last two years, Kidd has doubled the size of the program and has around 36 students enrolled.

Assistant Professor Savannah Sipple published two poems in the Spring 2015 issue of The Pikeville Review, two poems in the Winter 2015 issue of Appalachian Heritage, and one short in the anthology Appalachia Now: Short Stories of Contemporary Appalachia.

Assistant Professor Walter Smith started HCTC’s first Criminal Justice program in 2012. The program has grown to 100 students, prompting the need to hire an additional faculty member to meet the students’ needs.

Assistant Professor Amanda Spencer-Barnes is working on her doctorate degree in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies through Eastern Kentucky University. She expects to complete the program by 2018.

Associate Professor Jimmy Caudill obtained donations from Food City for the Diesel Technology Program. The refrigeration units and a 2010 Volvo Tractor/Truck are revitalizing the program. He also helped with the development of a new Truck Driving Certificate.

Associate Professor Dr. Jenna Boothe earned the Academic Excellence in Nursing, Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) from Western Kentucky University last spring. She started classes in fall 2015 at WKU to be a Family Nurse Practitioner.

Professor Dr. Paul Currie has done a stellar job in supporting HCTC transfer students seeking bachelor’s degrees and beyond. Dr. Currie serves as a liaison among the University Center of the Mountains, four-year science program advisors, and HCTC students, to enhance communication of student advising needs and to inform students of transfer services available to them.

Instructional Specialist Jesse Wooton is a published author of fiction. Into the Hills, The Garden, focuses on Paul Sizemore, who has a dark gift, which allows him to see things which he should not.

Phi Theta Kappa advisors Professor Michael Combs, Assistant Professor Chestina Turner, Professor Renee Back, and Professor Randy Moon reinvigorated the Hazard, Knott, and Leslie Phi Theta Kappa Honor’s Society Chapter. PTK Alpha Beta Epsilon Chapter participated in Share Our Strength’s No Kid Hungry Campaign to help feed hungry kids in America. Student Kristin Baker was awarded the PTK Scholarship at UK. The scholarship is over $11,000 for the year.

Professor Susan Johnson is working on expansion of the Cosmetology Program to the Lees College Campus. She started the Apprentice Instructor Training for the new program at Lees. Her Spa Day project netted a $1,100 donation to the ARH Cancer Center.

Professor Dr. Rich Holl’s book Committed to Victory: the Kentucky Home Front during World War II was published. The book offers a comprehensive look at Kentucky during the World War II era.

Associate Professor Arzella Howard is HCTC’s representative to Leadership East Kentucky where she is enhancing her leadership abilities.

Instructor Natasha Watts is a doctoral student at Morehead State University in the Educational Technology Division and hopes to graduate 2017. She worked on an educational podcast about cultural learning called “Talking with Tbird”.

HCTC faculty members are committed to excelling in their field, increasing their professional development, as well as offering services to help students succeed.

By Evelyn Wood

For The Hazard Herald

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