Hospice of the Bluegrass recognizes local doctors


By Kim Livesay - For The Hazard Herald



Courtesy Photos Jill Conway from Hospice of the Bluegrass honors Mitchell Wicker, MD, Hazard Clinic; Joe Kingery, DO, UK North Fork Valley Community Center; and Wendy Latunik, MD, Associate Medical Director, Hospice of the Bluegrass.


Courtesy Photos Jill Conway from Hospice of the Bluegrass honors Mitchell Wicker, MD, Hazard Clinic; Joe Kingery, DO, UK North Fork Valley Community Center; and Wendy Latunik, MD, Associate Medical Director, Hospice of the Bluegrass.


HAZARD — Doctors help bring new life into the word, save lives, and ease suffering. National Doctor’s Day on March 30 honors and celebrates these acts and the service of all physicians.

Hospice of the Bluegrass encourages everyone in the community to recognize their physicians on this special day and reflect on the hard work physicians do to help us live healthy lives. “We value both our Hospice doctors and the nearly 500 doctors we work with throughout the state,” said Liz Fowler, Hospice of the Bluegrass President and CEO. “We thank them for the skill and compassion they show in the care provided to all patients.”

Although people have been reportedly observing Doctors Day since the 1930s, it was made official, as a national day of recognition back in 1958, when the House of Representatives adopted a resolution commemorating doctors. Then, in 1991, the day became official when President George H.W. Bush signed a resolution into law that proclaimed the observance of a day honoring our country’s physicians annually every March 30.

“Common to the experience of each of them, from the specialist in research to the general practitioner, are hard work, stress, and sacrifice,” said President Bush in his proclamation. “All those Americans who serve as licensed physicians have engaged in years of study and training, often at great financial cost. Most endure long and unpredictable hours, and many must cope with the conflicting demands of work and family life.”

Hospice of the Bluegrass encourages people to recognize the doctors in their lives by sending a message of thanks in person, via email, or by sending a card or flowers. For those sending flowers, a red carnation is typically used as the symbolic flower for the special day.

Hospice of the Bluegrass is a national leader in delivering high quality end-of-life care and a pioneer in developing new programs that are responsive to the evolving needs of seriously ill patients and their families. In addition to providing hospice services in 32 counties across central, southeastern and northern Kentucky, Hospice of the Bluegrass operates the Palliative Care Center of the Bluegrass, Extra Care Private Duty Nursing, Bluegrass Care Choices and Kentucky Appalachian Transition Services. All of these programs offer invaluable services that enhance the quality of life of patients and families.

Courtesy Photos Jill Conway from Hospice of the Bluegrass honors Mitchell Wicker, MD, Hazard Clinic; Joe Kingery, DO, UK North Fork Valley Community Center; and Wendy Latunik, MD, Associate Medical Director, Hospice of the Bluegrass.
http://hazard-herald.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_Joe-Kingery-DO.jpgCourtesy Photos Jill Conway from Hospice of the Bluegrass honors Mitchell Wicker, MD, Hazard Clinic; Joe Kingery, DO, UK North Fork Valley Community Center; and Wendy Latunik, MD, Associate Medical Director, Hospice of the Bluegrass.

Courtesy Photos Jill Conway from Hospice of the Bluegrass honors Mitchell Wicker, MD, Hazard Clinic; Joe Kingery, DO, UK North Fork Valley Community Center; and Wendy Latunik, MD, Associate Medical Director, Hospice of the Bluegrass.
http://hazard-herald.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_Mitchell-Wicker-MD.jpgCourtesy Photos Jill Conway from Hospice of the Bluegrass honors Mitchell Wicker, MD, Hazard Clinic; Joe Kingery, DO, UK North Fork Valley Community Center; and Wendy Latunik, MD, Associate Medical Director, Hospice of the Bluegrass.

By Kim Livesay

For The Hazard Herald

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